NieR: Automata game review


The post-apocalyptic world of Nier: Automata thrives on its mysteries. Its ruined Earth setting may be a playground of mayhem wherever trendy androids lay waste to less refined trying robots. Its premise of a unending war is at the start simple. But if you recognize something regarding the game's director, Yoko Taro, then you recognize to expect the surprising.

That includes everything from AN uncommon audio recording steeped in vocals to a battle-hardened heroine WHO walks with the swagger of a manakin. Automata additionally delivers a well-executed and refined combat system, the amount of that alone makes  Automata well definitely worth the worth of admission.


Its ruined Earth setting may be a playground of mayhem where fashionable androids lay waste to less sophisticated looking robots.. But if you recognize anything about the game's director, Yoko Taro, then you recognize to expect the unexpected. that has everything from an unusual soundtrack steeped in vocals to a battle-hardened heroine who walks with the swagger of a supermodel. Automata also delivers a well-executed and refined combat system, the extent of which alone makes Automata well well worth the price of admission.


You're expected to use tools and techniques beyond the 2 main attack inputs if you've got any hope of victory in ever encounter. Your pod companion--which echoes Grimoire Weiss, the floating book from the primary Nier--provides you with various sorts of support. Not only does the pod provide you with a sustained ranged attack, it's another outlet for personalizing your approach to combat. You can swap during a big variety of passive performance enhancing chips, that provide you with stat buffs and helpful automated commands. Relying on your pod to automatically use one of your health items when your HP drops below a certain point makes healing one less thing to worry about. Your pod allows you to focus on other survival concerns, like kicking ass and looking good in the process.


Given the demanding yet rewarding high-dexterity combat and therefore the acrobatic skills of 2B, it wouldn't be unreasonable to mention that Automata is that the closest thing there's to a spiritual successor to Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance, also developed by Platinum.


If you ever run out of healing items and get murdered by enemy robot, however, you’ll lose your experience points if you can't return to the point of your last death. This is almost like the design of difficulty popularized by Dark Souls with a further risk of loss: along side the suspense of probably losing experience you've earned since your last save, you'll also lose all of your pod's installed chips, with the exception of the mandatory OS chip.

While Automata resoundingly delivers that specific flavor of trendy combat found in Platinum's best works, it never overshadows Taro's distinct directorial handiwork and penchant for unconventional game and narrative design. it is the sort of production that seamlessly blends story, hack-and-slash combat, and--believe it or not--an engaging bullet-hell shooter component. you do not question the infantile behaviors of the many of the enemy robots because they're so darn endearing. And you do not get an evidence for 2B's cosplay-ready gothic lolita outfits, how she manages to maneuver smoothly through a desert in heels, or why a number of her comrades behave like self-involved teenagers. you only go along side it due to Automata's captivating world and involving battles.